Sunday, February 26, 2012

kathleen fitzpatrick, "tech innovator"!!

The Chronicle of Higher Education recognizes Kathleen Fitzpatrick's amazing work in Digital Humanities scholarship ... and how her networked approach got DH noticed at the MLA (among other great things!). For many, the recognition is sweet validation, for others, it's "doi!" ... and for some, it's a worrisome hint of potentially wider institutionalization of some specifically innovative, tech-infused pedagogical work. Discuss ...

Saturday, February 25, 2012

digital humanities ("how to")






I'm happy to have found a lovely blog radiating a sense of what is meant by "digital humanities" (DH) and "digital scholarship." 

Lisa Spiro, Director of the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITTLE), has created an inviting web presence at Digital Scholarship in the Humanities. Check it out. Discuss ...

Friday, February 17, 2012

"This is so limited, it's unbearable" (Sirc)

Sirc's review essay, in which he laments the constraining and lauds the occasionally brill views and enactments of writing pedagogy. Discuss.

Saturday, February 4, 2012

owning it

I never post pictures of myself, eating. So first, you're welcome. Second, to answer the obvi  "why now?" I can assure you that I have not altered my policy but have instead acted upon the joy I associate with the happy situation. See, these were guilt-free fried oysters from scrumptious Steelhead Diner in Seattle. They are, officially, Flash Fried Totten Inlet Pacific Oysters with Kashmiri Curried Cocktail Sauce, from the brunch menu ($9.95). I was celebrating, living it up, you know, like someone who is not pretty freakishly and shamefacedly obsessed with dieting and body issues and whatnot ... like someone who had recently shared her first bit of "installation art."   

Frankly, I still can't believe that I was supported in this effort, and I am intensely grateful for my friends and colleagues who made it so. It was one of my favorite moments in life, putting it all together, seeing the curiosity as the installation assembled, readjusted and revised and scramblingly came together as "a piece." Of course, I had done my work on the front end. I had done the "rhetorical" work of discovering a purpose, thought carefully about the gallery context, and appropriately integrated audience awareness. And, as one experiences in any creative process, all sorts of affective intensities and associated gestures showed up throughout the process; all, delightful, if at times maddeningly complicated. Like desire. The piece was essentially about desire. And pleasure. Thus, the happy oyster-eating shot (hey, now!).


More on the installation + publication plans + conference reflection (CW 2012!) ... soon.